Morning Crank: An Excuse to Remove Us Immediately

1. The city council’s approval of the HALA upzone in South Lake Union and downtown yesterday—which requires developers to make between 2 and 5 percent of their new units affordable, or pay a fee of up to $13.50 per square foot into an affordable-housing fund—played out pretty much as everybody expected it would. aAnti-development activists booed loudly and shouted “Shame!” when council members Rob Johnson and Tim Burgess spoke in favor of the legislation, the Raging Grannies sang, and Lisa Herbold proposed an amendment that would have required developers to contribute more to affordable housing, which lost.

Oh, and Kshama Sawant gave a speech.

But there were some familiar faces who were missing from today’s HALA hearing—namely, the single-family homeowners and erstwhile affordable housing advocates who turn out in droves (and even sue the city) when a proposed upzone threatens to allow apartments (or cottages) in their North Seattle backyards. When the U District upzone was up before the council, for example, homeowners from across North Seattle filled council chambers, decrying developers as heartless opportunists and demanding greater concessions in the form of large affordable housing mandates that would have made the upzone unworkable. And yet, when an upzone that actually constitutes more of a giveaway to developers, because it will require them to build less affordable housing than in any other upzoned part of the city, came up, they were nowhere to be found.

Weird. It’s almost as if they care more about preserving exclusive single-family zoning in their own neighborhoods than they do about making sure developers provide affordable housing in every part of the city.

2. Homeless residents of the West Seattle bridge encampment where an RV caught fire last week said they have been informed that the city will sweep their camp tomorrow morning at 9. The fire destroyed two RVs at the camp, which has been home to dozens of people in recent months. It was ruled an accident.

Rebecca Massey, who has lived at the encampment for the last eight months, told the council yesterday morning that the city was using the fire as “an excuse to remove us immediately.

“They’re offering a few individuals places to go, but most of the people that live there are not being told where to go—they’re just being told you have to leave,” Massey said. “The housing solution for the homeless is great, [but] it’s a long-term solution—it’s an eventual solution—and there’s people living under the bridge in my community that have been on the waiting list for housing for years.”

3. Council president Bruce Harrell, who would become mayor if Mayor Ed Murray were to resign in the wake of a lawsuit alleging he molested a teenage boy in the 1980s, said yesterday that the council would have no comment on the allegations, then went on to comment:

“Our city cannot afford to be distracted. There is a judicial process that will address the serious allegations that this situation has presented, and we will respect that process and the rights of all parties involved. All accusations of abuse require a thorough investigation. It is in our human nature to immediately want answers, but I ask we not cast aspersions to the parties involved before we have all the facts through the legal process. I am confident that through this process, truth and justice will prevail.”

Murray isn’t hiding from public view. Yesterday, he attended a naturalization ceremony at the downtown library (where he was trailed by multiple TV cameras) and went to the Mariners’ opening game.

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5 thoughts on “Morning Crank: An Excuse to Remove Us Immediately

  1. Pingback: Underlining Like Mad #165: “Erstwhile Affordable Housing Advocates” – The Pedestrian Chronicles

  2. Pingback: Afternoon Crank: I’m Shocked At the Scale of That | The C Is for crank

  3. Yes, specifically in the SLU and downtown rezone (the lege passed yesterday) the requirement is for developers to pay up to $17.50 per square foot or provide up to 10.6% of gross floor area for affordable housing when the building is commercial (office or hotel). It is only the portions of the building that are being built as residential that the lower thresholds are allowed (under the theory that providing housing is already a good in and of itself). Since the vast majority of development in SLU and downtown is commercial, the majority of fees paid (or space provided on-site) will be at the higher rates.

    Page 10 of the Director’s Report shows the chart. The Commercial rates on the right side of the chart are the ones that will be used for most of the new development. http://www.seattle.gov/Documents/Departments/HALA/SLU_DOWNTOWN/Director%27s%20Report%20-%20MHA%20Implementation%20in%20DT%20SLU.pdf)

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  4. Minor correction for #1; HALA requires developers to make between 2 and 10.6 percent of their new units or gross floor area affordable or pay a fee of up to $17.50…

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